Master list of every artist that I’ve recorded

Not that anybody asked for it, but here’s the complete list of every artist that I’ve recorded over the years. Actually, I most likely have recorded more than those listed here, but in the super early days when I first started recording concerts in the 90s (proper recordings; the cassette bootlegs I did before that don’t count), there were probably a few where I didn’t keep a copy of the master audio files or the finished mixdown or anything. Artists that I’ve recorded multiple times are listed only once.

No doubt I still missed some, so if I forgot your band, drop me a note.

Just wanted to compile a list. I’ll keep adding to it as new names come along.

(303) 909-1604

∆AIMON

Abelcain

Ad.ver.sary

Ars Dada

The Audacity

Author & Punisher

BAAL

Christoph de Babalon

Babyland

Bad Timing

Todd Barton

Baseck

Bestial Mouths

Black Jeans

Bloodysnowman

Bombardier

Bong-Ra

William Braintree

Branes

Broken Note

Tom Brosseau

Tom Burbank

Buzz Campbell and Hot Rod Lincoln

Cardopusher

CNN 666

Cohosh

Company Fuck

Continues

Corrections House

Corvx de Timor

Crowhurst

Cyrus Rex

D2

Daedelus

Death Is Not a Color

Defrag

Dev/Null

Richard Devine

Devo

Dimentia

Diskore

Divtech

DJ Hidden

DJMREX

Djoto

Mike Dobler

Oliver Dodd

Drumatic

Duran Duran Duran

Brian E

Eezir

Electric Company

Enduser

Eras

Exillon

Eyeless Sight

Fanny

Felt Drawings

FFF

The Flashbulb

Flourescent Grey

Former Ghosts

Fractional

Christoph Fringeli

Graz

Gross Prophet

Grypt

Hecate

Steev Hise

Mark Hosler

i*wish*i

I:Gor

Imminent

The Incredible Hexadecibels

Indian Jewelry

Iszoloscope

Izapa

Joy Through Noise

cEvin Key

Kid 606

KK Null

Koonda Holaa

Kush Arora

LA Vamps

Ladyscraper

Loera

Loopgoat

The Mattson 2

Medicine

Merzbow

Derek Michael

Ming & Ping

Minion

Moab

Mochipet

Monster X

Ted Nava

Nemeton

Next Life

Nilbog

No Age

Lee Noble / Grant Capes / Derek Rogers

NoiseX

Noize Creator

Nommo Ogo

Not Breathing

David Oliphant

P•A•L

Genesis P-Orridge

Gregory Page

Parenthetical Girls

Phthalocyanine

Piles

The Pizarro Brothers

The Punk Group

Quartet Nouveau

Raxyor

The Red Elvises

Reflector

John C. Reilly

Rodent516

Roses

S.E.M;I

Otto von Schirach

The Screamin’ Primas

Scuzi

Skincage

Sleep Clinic

Somatic Responses

Split Horizon

Spyten

Ssleeperhold

Stab City

Strangeloop

The Striggles

Sunwheel

Damo Suzuki’s Network

Tearist

Techdiff

Terminal 11

Thee Source ov Fawnation

This Song Is a Mess But So Am I

The Tleilaxu Music Machine

Tomoroh Hidari

Twin Braids

UteroZZZAAA

Venetian Snares

wAgAwAgA

Wet Mango

Wisp

WMX

Xanopticon

Yellow Then Blue

Youth Code

Zola Jesus

Zombieflesheater

Zoogma

The Cure’s Plainsong (The Humorless Productions Restoration)

It’s fair to say that Disintegration is The Cure’s magnum opus. I can’t say I was too much a fan of it when it came out; I was much more a metal head back in those days. But over the years, as my tastes expanded, I’ve definitely gained an appreciation for both the album and the band.

One thing that always bothered me about Disintegration, though, was the mix. Having remastered hundreds of albums, in listening to this, I knew remastering this one wasn’t going to be easy. In fact, many albums from this era are plagued with the same with the same sonic imprint, made most difficult with the ground work of a dull, unsparkly band sound combined with an extremely sibilant vocal track. Disintegration is the worst offender. All the early Van Halen albums come in a close second and were a total pain in the ass when I remastered them for myself.

My first attempt at remastering Disintegration was many years ago, but I was never happy with it. Every time I heard it I always wondered if they just simply mixed the album wrong. Which is why I was hopeful when the remastered deluxe reissue came out in 2010. I had my fingers crossed that they would deal with some of the mix issues, as they were clearly evident to me. But to no avail, as the reissue didn’t sound too much different than the original. So obviously they meant it to sound like that, which is beyond me. So now I’ve taken matters into my own hands.

If you listen to the first track, Plainsong, and listen very closely, you’ll hear that there is a hi hat playing straight 16ths through the entire song, but it’s so buried in the mix that it may as well not be there. So how would I bring out that hi hat but not blow the high end in the keyboards and vocals through the roof? Well, I cheated, and added my own. Then I thought, why stop there? Why not fix some of the other problems in the drum part? I didn’t want to do anything too elaborate or involved, but I knew that adding a couple drum parts would make a world of difference. Here’s how it went down-

1. Well, it’s not the first thing I did, but the first thing you’ll hear is the intro. I kept the wind chime / bells as is, but boosted their level a good bit. I always thought their level was way too low. I also layered in two different ambient sounds, which I grabbed from some sample pack from Techdiff. It makes that intro sound a little bit less detached from the rest of the song. I briefly considered putting in some string parts or a synth melody, maybe to do some musical foreshadowing to the main body of the song. But I nixed that idea pretty quickly, and just went with the atmospheres.

2. Then onto the drums. First the added hi hat, straight 16ths just like the original. I didn’t want it to sound so narrow, though, so I threw on a chorus to give it some breadth, and also a slight auto-panner to give it a little left-right action. Not too much, very subtle. Sounded too mechanical at first, so I gave it a bit of a human feel by adding in some accents and some slight volume-up/volume-down variations.

3. Then I added a snare sound, again doubling the original. But the original is more of a thud, whereas I wanted more of a crack. I pulled one out of my magical bag of snares, and put it as well as the hi hat through an appropriate reverb.

4. I also wanted to address the kick sound, and that was a bit tricky. I applied an eq to the original track where I killed as much of the original kick as possible without losing any of the nice low end in the song. Then I inserted a new kick sound, which has more body to it, and a little bit more of a click. For that I used an instrument called Nicky Romero’s Kick. To be honest, I have no idea who Nicky Romero is, but it’s a versatile kick drum VST, directed more towards techno production and other electronic sub-genres I think. But like I say, it’s very versatile, and I fixed up a kick that works just fine.

5. One last thing- for the song itself, I used the original version, not the 2010 remaster. Not that it would have mattered, because either way, it was gonna require a little work. The most pressing issue was all that harsh sibilance on the vocals, so minimized most of that with a DeEsser.

And that’s pretty much it. I considered putting in a second hi hat track, something a little bit more elaborate. Maybe something along the lines of Autechre’s BassCadet, with all the ping-pong-y scraping percussive sounds. But, I thought that would have been overkill, and I just wanted to keep it fairly simple and straight forward.